Last edited by Akirr
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, August 14, 1776. found in the catalog.

A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, August 14, 1776.

Henry Laurens

A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, August 14, 1776.

by Henry Laurens

  • 39 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by privately printed for the Columbia University Libraries in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • South Carolina,
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Slavery -- United States -- Early works to 1800.,
    • South Carolina -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Sources.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementForeword by Alfred C. Berol. Introd. by Richard B. Morris.
      GenreEarly works to 1800.
      ContributionsLaurens, John, 1754-1782., Morris, Richard Brandon, 1904-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE446 .L36
      The Physical Object
      Pagination30 p.
      Number of Pages30
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5935477M
      LC Control Number65002382
      OCLC/WorldCa6312789

      The concluding volume of a prestigious documentary edition; This, the sixteenth and final volume of The Papers of Henry Laurens, covers the last ten years of the statesman's life. During this period, Henry Laurens spent a hectic twenty-two months as a peace commissioner traveling between Paris and London, conferring with British ministers and his colleagues on the peace commission. A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, Aug Morrisania: Mr. Laurens's true state of the case: by which his candor to Mr. Edmund Jenings is manifested, and the tricks of Mr. Jenings are detected. The papers of Henry Laurens.

        A steadfast republican, Henry Laurens adhered even after three years of war to the ideologically correct notion that such an army should not be a standing one composed of professional soldiers but rather a provisional force of patriotic citizen volunteers who, like his son John, esteemed "the loss of estate a cheap price to pay for the honor of. Biography from Benson J. Lossing in his Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution [with minor edits]: John Laurens was a son of Henry Laurens, president of the Continental Congress in He joined the army early in and was wounded in the battle of Germantown.

      Henry Laurens was devastated by the news of his son’s death. When informed he was in England, working to negotiate a peace treaty. Upon learning of John’s death, Henry soon returned to South Carolina and made arrangements to have his son’s body reburied on his Mepkin estate. John Laurens’s gravestone is inscribed with the fitting tribute. Manuscript copy of a letter in the hand of Henry Laurens from General John Burgoyne to General William Heath, Cambridge. January 9, Folio, 1 page. Concerns the behavior of one Col. Healy, and disturbances at the barracks. 1 6 Autograph manuscript letter signed by John Lloyd to Henry Laurens, Nantes. Febru and Ma


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A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, August 14, 1776 by Henry Laurens Download PDF EPUB FB2

About this Item: Gale, Sabin Americana, United States, Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book. Title: A South Carolina protest against slavery: being a letter from Henry Laurens, second president of the Continental Congress, to his son, Colonel John Laurens, dated Charleston, S.C., August 14th, now first published from the thor: Henry LaurensPublisher: Gale.

Laurens, Henry, Letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, Aug New York, privately printed for the Columbia University Libraries, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Henry Laurens; John Laurens; Richard B Morris.

A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, Aug [Laurens, Henry] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, Aug Author: Henry Laurens. " A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, Aug " @en " A letter from Henry Laurens to his son, John Laurens, Aug " workExample.

To Washington’s bewilderment, Gates copied Congress thus making the letter public. Henry Laurens learned of this through his son, a Washington Aide-to-Camp. John Laurens wrote A letter from Henry Laurens to his son his father from headquarters on January 3rd, giving this assessment in.

LETTERS FROM HON. HENRY LAURENS TO HIS SON JOHN, [Continued from the April number.] [] Addressed: A Monsieur Monsieur Jean Laurens. 1776. book Paris a Geneve Aston in Shropshire 25 May My Dear Son.

Your Brother James & T, arrived here two days ago, on a visit to our friends in this Quarter & to take. Henry Laurens Called “Conservative Revolutionary” Henry Laurens was in a bit of a quandary at the onset of the American Revolution.

The namesake o f the only American Revolutionary War fort built in what now is the state of Ohio, could have just as easily been an English Tory as he was an American patriot. Born in Charleston, South Carolina inHenry Laurens was sent to England by his.

Book/Printed Material A South Carolina protest against slavery: being a letter from Henry Laurens, second President of the Continental Congress, to his son, Colonel John Laurens; dated Charleston, S.

C., August 14th, Now published from the original. The papers include a group of sixteen letters of Henry Laurens, the South Carolina planter, and his son, John Laurens, among which is a magnificent "manumission letter" written by Henry Laurens to his son on 14 Augustbarely a month after the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

My Dear, Dear, Son, Adieu- Henry Laurens, M r. John Laurens— Endorsed: 16 th Jan y. {This completes the publication of such of the originals of the letters written by Hon. Henry Laurens to his son, John, during the years i> x > x an das are in the Laurens Collection of the South Carolina Historical Society.

A South Carolina Protest Against Slavery: Being a Letter From Henry Laurens, Second President of the Continental Congress, to His Son, Colonel John S.

C., August 14th, (Classic Reprint) [Laurens, Henry] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A South Carolina Protest Against Slavery: Being a Letter From Henry Laurens, Second President of the Continental Author: Henry Laurens.

A South Carolina protest against slavery: being a letter from Henry Laurens, second President of the Continental Congress, to his son, Colonel John Laurens; dated Charleston, S.

C., August 14th, Now published from the original by Laurens, Henry, A Letter from Henry Laurens to his Son John Laurens, Augwith an extensive introduction by Richard B.

Morris. In it had been published for the Zenger Club as a pamphlet entitled A South Carolina Protest Against Slavery, the purpose of such publica tion being to serve "as additional evidence against the Southern theory, that. The largest group of manuscripts in the collection is the sixteen letters of Henry Laurens, the South Carolina planter, and his son, John Laurens, among which is a magnificent "manumission letter" written by Henry Laurens to his son on 14 Augustbarely a.

[17] Henry Laurens to John Laurens, Aug in Papers of Henry Laurens, [18] “Henry Laurens,” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, (Washington: Government Printing Office, ), ; Papers of Henry Laurens, See also McDonough, Gadsden and Laurens.

Unable to keep his son out of the war, Henry Laurens used his influence to obtain a position of honor and some degree of safety for him. John Laurens was invited to join General Washington’s staff as a volunteer aide-de-camp in early August   One of them, John Laurens of South Carolina, seemed destined for greatness.

The son of a president of Congress, Henry Laurens, John was born into the life of a country gentleman. His father was a successful businessman, planter, and well-respected citizen of Charleston. John was taken to England for his education in (John Laurens painted by Charles Willson Peale, John Laurens came from a prominent family in South Carolina and his father, Henry, laid out his views in a letter of Aug You know, my dear son, I abhor slavery In former days there was no combating the prejudices of man supported by interest.

The day I hope is. Henry Laurens (). Merchant, planter, and statesman. Source. Early Career. Henry Laurens ’ s forebears were Huguenots, Protestants who fled France after the Edict of Nantes was revoked in Henry ’ s grandfather Andre Laurens left earlier, inand eventually made his way to America, settling first in New York City and then Charleston, South Carolina.

John Laurens is buried at his fathers old plantation, Mepkin, now a Catholic monastery, near Moncks Corner, South Carolina.

The epitaph which Henry chose for his son's grave marker, is a famous line from the Roman poet Horace: "Dulce et decorum est, pro patria mori." (It is sweet and proper to die for one's country.").

John Laurens, (born OctoCharleston, South Carolina [U.S.]—died AugCombahee River, south of Charleston), American Revolutionary War officer who served as aide-de-camp to Gen. George Washington. John was the son of Henry Laurens, an American statesman who aligned himself with the patriot cause at an early was educated in England, and when he returned .To remind Jack t o carefully consider his choices and actions, Laurens character, which you could not expect in any high style if you were to commence Soldier HL to John Laurens, AugVol.

11, Henry Laurens as quoted in Rakove, Revolutionaries Ibid, HL to John Laurens, January 8,Vol. 11, On July 7, he signed an order that upon his death his slave George be made a free man. He did manage to take some time on Novem and petition Congress for compensation of rice supplied to Continental troops in on behalf of his son, John Laurens’, daughter.